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American-Canadian Genealogist, Vol. 43, Issue #148, No. 1 2017

Table of Contents

President’s Page

Bernadette Meunier, #9489………………………………………………………………………………………….2

A Tribute to Co-Founder Roger Lawrence, #1 ………………………………………………………….. 4

Editor’s Page
Pauline Cusson #2572………………………………………………………………………………………………. 6

From Other Publications
Larry Autotte, #3505…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7

What’s New on Our Shelves

Jeanne Boisvert, #6394…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12

Catherine de Baillon’s Emigration to New France: The Key Role Played by
Louis-Théandre Chartier
Jean-René Côté and Anita Seni ………………………………………………………………………………… 13

 

L’Etoile d’Acadie

   Time Passes, Memories Live On: A Lehuédé from North America
   Discovers Ancestral Roots in Brittany, France
Barbara Le Blanc, Ph.D. …………………………………………………………………………………………… 40

Queries and Answers
Mary Anna Paquette #2378……………………………………………………………………………………….. 49

New Members
Stephen Lefoley #4141 …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 51

ACGS Spring Conference Details ……………………………………………………………………………. 52

Research and Sales Catalog …………………………………………………………………………………… Center pages

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President’s Page
Bernadette D. Meunier, #9489

On November 16, 2016, Roger W. Lawrence, ACGS membership # 1, passed away in peace and comfort at the Veteran’s Home in Tilton, NH. He was 2 months short of his 97th birthday.

When I was elected President of the American-Canadian Genealogical Society in September, the organization that Roger co-founded almost 50 years ago, I felt compelled to at least meet and perhaps get to know him. Although I had been introduced to him about a year prior at his book signing, we did not have the opportunity to talk.

Mel Montpelier, his longtime friend and regular visitor, graciously agreed to let me accompany him on one of his visits.

So on a glorious Fall day in New Hamp­shire, with all the trees standing confident in their brilliant colors, I felt confident that the day could not be improved upon. Until I met Roger.

I can truthfully say that I got to really know Roger on that visit. Although frail and in a physically weakened state, no longer able to get out of bed, as Mel introduced us, Roger extended his hand to shake mine. The strength and vitality of that handshake surprised me. It belied the frailness of the figure lying there. I could feel his vigor and spirit still so much alive in him. His voice was barely above a whisper. He apologized for that.

As I looked around the room, the quality and significance of this man’s life came into focus. He was surrounded by things that were meaningful to him and that defined the totality of his being.

Crucifix over his bed – who among us Franco-Americans did not grow up with this cultural detail?

Directly in his line of sight, affixed on the wall were more religious icons, including one of Mary and of her mother, Ste. Anne, the patroness of Quebec – three genera­tions:  Jesus, His Mother, and His Grandmother.

And on a shelf, again directly in his line of vision, framed pictures of what I assumed were of his family. Some did not appear to be of recent vintage. I supposed that this pictorial display was also multi-generational.

There, on this one wall, was Roger’s cultural heritage, his religious identity, his family, and his passion, genealogy.

To his left, was testament to his patriotism. Next to a shadow box containing 6 medals, silent reminders of the various campaigns and combats in which he had participated, neatly hung his military uniform from WW ll.

Other bits and pieces on display about the room all validated Roger’s reputation for being a Renaissance man.

When the topic of research and genealogy came up, he motioned to his computer which was on a desk a bit behind him and said in an amazingly strong voice “It’s all there. There is still work to be done.”   The spirit certainly was still willing – he wished he had Kim to help him.   She had assisted him in the past with some of his many projects.

Mel followed up with all of Kim’s capabilities, her computer skills, her organizational abilities and so on. “What you need is another Kim!” said Mel. From the bed, in a voice barely audible above a whisper, but with a twinkle in his eye, came the response “and with long legs.”

That is when I fully realized and appreciated that this man, this Renaissance man, had lived the good life, savoring as well as contributing all the best that humanity has to offer. With no regrets – other than it being done too soon.

To his family, friends and all of us at ACGS who mourn his passing, may we find a measure of comfort in the PARABLE OF IMMORTALITY – by the 19th century poet Henry Van Dyke.

I am standing upon the seashore.
A ship at my side spreads her white sails to the morning breeze

and starts for the blue ocean.
She is an object of beauty and strength,
and I stand and watch until at last she hangs
like a speck of white cloud just where the sea and sky

come down to mingle with each other.
Then someone at my side says, ‘There she goes!’

Gone where? Gone from my sight… that is all.
She is just as large in mast and hull and spar
as she was when she left my side
and just as able to bear her load of living freight

 to the place of destination.

Her diminished size is in me, not in her.
And just at the moment
when someone at my side says,
‘There she goes!’
There are other eyes watching her coming…
and other voices ready to take up the glad shout…
‘Here she comes!’

I cannot help but feel that on November 16, 2016 there was a vast gathering of Franco-American eyes watching his arrival and echoing throughout the heavens, there was indeed a glad shout: “Roger est arrivé!”

 

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Editor’s Page
Pauline Cusson, #2572
editor@acgs.org

I want to thank our President, Bernadette Doucette Meunier for the tribute to our co-founder, the late Roger W. Lawrence, #1. She clearly captured the sentiments of many who knew Roger. Thank you, Bernadette.

We are lucky that some of our French colleagues in Quebec are anxious to have their work published in English in our journal. As a result of Dennis Taylor’s inquiry into the back­ground on Catherine de Baillon, and a partial translation, the authors of a 22-page article in the Mémoires, the official journal of the Société Généalogique Canadien-Française [SGCF], agreed to translate portions of their article for our readers. I’m quite excited that they took so much time from their busy schedules to make this connection between the Chartiers and Baillons so vivid for our readers. Be sure to read the footnotes  in this article – some old myths are debunked.

At the risk of being repetitive, I could not ignore the well-cited and well-document article submitted as a result of the English Captives book and the follow-up article by Roger Verboncoeur we did on the John MacCluer family. As Roger V. indicated to me, the article by Jacqueline Dinan has far more details than his. Thank you, Roger and Jacqueline. This article will be the basis of a supplement to the English Captives book and the reason for a future second edition for this book.

We have a returning author for the Acadian section – Barbara LeBlanc with an article on the Lehuédé family in Brittany, Franceand Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. This is about an amazing journey of courage, perseverance and love of family and history. Well done again, Barbara.

To the regular Editorial staff that supports the Journal and provides an enormous service to the Editor in making this one of the best journals in the realm of small ethnic societies, I can’t thank you enough. I look forward to working with all of you for another year.  Many of our feature section authors have been contributing for the past 16 years and I hope we get at least 16 more together.

I would also like to welcome Stephen Lefoley who is now processing member­ship and providing the New Members list in the journal and the mailing list that Bernadette Meunier provided for the past several years.

If you are a snowbird, don’t forget to let Steve know when you are back up north to be sure we have the correct mailing address for each issue.

Once again, ACGS will have a Spring Conference with local speakers on April 22 in our library at the corner of 4 Elm and West Baker streets – entrance on the side. Plenty of free parking in the rear of the building.

Please look at the Research Services page on the inserts in the middle of the book. You’ll fin some slight changes to our pricing structure and some added services.