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American-Canadian Genealogist, Vol. 40, Issue #147, Third Trimester 2016

Table of Contents

President’s Letter

Bernadette Meunier, #9489………………………………………………………………………………………….110

Editor’s Page
Pauline Cusson #2572……………………………………………………………………………………………… 111

From Other Publications
Larry Autotte, #3505…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 112

New Books on Our Shelves

Jeanne Boisvert, #6394…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 120

My Québécois Urgroßmutter: Claudia Fitzbach
Larry Autotte, #3505…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 123

Edward Colcord

Dennis Taylor, #3708………………………………………………………………………………………………… 130

Jacques Ritchot a.k.a. Richard Nason

Jeanne Boisvert #6394……………………………………………………………………………………………… 137

Homesteading, Orcas Island – Washington State
Jeanne Boisvert #6394……………………………………………………………………………………………… 105

L’Etoile d’Acadie

     Acadian Odyssey: Deportations and Migrations (1755 – 1816) – Part II
Paul Delaney…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 144

Queries and Answers
Mary Anna Paquette #2378…………………………………………………………………………………………. 170

New Members
Bernadette Meunier #9489………………………………………………………………………………………….. 172

Surname Index for the year ………………………………………………………………………… at end of issue.

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President’s Letter
Bernadette D. Meunier, #9489

The fall General Membership meeting in September was once again well attended and proved to be a rewarding experience. After the Mix & Mingle buffet breakfast, the outgoing President, Jim Gaudet, called the meeting to order and the election of a new slate of officers and Board of Directors was held. Muriel Normand #5706 was elected Vice President; Ronald Blais #6271 Treasurer; Jeanne Lundell #10078 Recording Secretary; Paula Schulz #10048 Corresponding Secretary.

Newly elected Directors are Stephen Lefoley #4141 who has also agreed to take on the Membership Chair’s responsibilities. And, we welcome back Constance Hebert #5175. Constance previously served as a Director and for many years shared her skills at unraveling some of the challenges encountered by countless family historians/genealogists as chair of the Research Department.

Following the business meeting the program combined the best features of historical exploration into the lives and circumstances of not only the Franco- American immigrant experience, but also the early New England colonial experience. Kevin Sweeney, Professor Emeritus at Amherst College, explored the tumultuous, trying times and heated controversies with his excellent presentation of the raiding and captive taking along the New England and New York borders between 1688 and 1748.

The next two presenters on the day’s agenda brought us to the Canadian immi- grant experience: Jim Beauchesne with his presentation, “Caught in the Middle, French-Canadians in the Immigrant City, Lawrence, Mass.”; Aurore Eaton with her presentation, “The Amoskeag Manufac- turing Company and How It Made Manchester.” In addition to being a writer and columnist, Aurore is also known as the History Lady and, on that score, her discourse did not disappoint.

On a more personal note, I am perhaps the first to serve as President of ACGS whose roots are not firmly planted in Quebec. Although “une Acadienne,” my one link to Quebec is my fourth great-grandfather, David Dufour, who came from the Baie St. Paul area. He established that branch of the family in the St. John Valley in Northern Maine which is where I was born. He did, however, have the good sense to marry “une Acadienne.”

It is my desire to continue to build on the work of all who came before me. Although the nature and methodology of genealogical research is in a state of flux, technology and the internet especially have presented us with an overabundance of opportunities as well as challenges. Our options for keeping the Society relevant are truly a horizon of opportunities. I will keep you informed of our progress as we explore this technologically modern frontier while remaining true to our mission.

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Editor’s Page
Pauline Cusson, #2572
editor@acgs.org

This issue came together rather quietly and quickly. We have Part II of Paul Delaney’s much applauded day-by-day, ship-by-ship, article on the plight of the Acadiens for years after the Grande Dérangement.

Jeanne Boisvert has also brought to light, her connection to captive, Richard Nasson a.k.a. Jacques Ritchot and the author of one of the Ritchot articles in the last issue, Janine Penfield.

Another of Jeanne’s favorite things to do, is to peruse journals from the Midwest and Northwest genealogical and historical societies to find stories of our French- Canadian ancestors who chose to go west. See the article on Orcas Island.

Jeanne also continues to review new books that come into the library. While these are not necessarily reviews of books she has read cover to cover, she does peruse them and include the publishers’ overview of the books. Obviously, this would not include any negative publicity about a book and we leave it to the readers to decide if a book is helpful to our readers.

In the previous issue of the Genealogist, Dennis Taylor also wrote, in great detail, the story of the Richard Nason ancestors in England and their descendants in America who were captured by the French and Indians and carried to Quebec. In this issue, Dennis brings us the tales of a very colorful character connected to the Nasons. Shuah Colcord who married Richard Nason in Kittery, Maine, is the daughter of Edward Colcord, a character you will

find in many early New England town histories.

Larry Autotte began investigating one of his ancestors with a German ancestry. When he first mentioned it to me, I was intrigued by some of the events and asked him many times, ‘how can that be?’ We went on a trail of discovery that was quite enlightening to me even though it was not my ancestor and prob- ably not any of yours. The avenues and rabbit holes we went down were good lessons learned. I hope his research will prompt others to look at that one person in your tree that you never pursued because it seemed impossible to solve 10 or 20 years ago.

I would also interject that it was really Larry’s due diligence and tenacity that really brings this kind of article to the attention of our readers.

Job well-done for all of our authors in this issue and many previous issues.

I had a serendipity moment while on vacation recently. Through a young woman I met, she told me about a woman from out of town who wanted to know if there was a local genealogy society or library she could find – she was on vacation in the town of her ancestors but had no idea where to begin! So, she stopped at a cemetery she was passing and asked in the office if anyone knew where she could start with her research on her ancestors who were in that town in 1850. Pretty clever, I thought……and something that may help our readers in the future.

American-Canadian Genealogist, Vol. 42, Issue 147, 3rd Trimester, 2016